Peer Support Research

Poetry for Personal Power has done extensive review of peer support research. This includes a review of trauma healing, peer-run programs, peer support implementation, and layperson mental health interventions. The organization utilizes a base of research on trauma healing, resilience, peer support implementation, and layperson mental health interventions.

Further, our peer support research component promotes recovery and resiliency through fidelity to evidence-based program models.

  • We follow Dr. Jean Campbell’s COSP-FACIT peer support research (Consumer-Operated Support Programs – Fidelity Assessment Common Ingredients Tool). This is a survey used for a number of years in Missouri, and is recognized by SAMHSA as an evidence-based practice.

    Dr. Jean Campbell, one of the leaders in peer support research. Here at the Heartland Consumer Network Training.

    Dr. Jean Campbell, one of the leaders in peer support research. Here at the Heartland Consumer Network Training.

  • We follow components needed as lay people (non-medical professionals) can promote recovery and resiliency. Vikram Patel has won many awards for summarizing research in Uganda, India, and Ghana, that shows that recovery from depression can move from 40-50% to 70-90% with a short intervention by a trained layperson.
  • This is very similar to the core competencies peer support research, as determined by SAMHSA.
  • The organization also works from a research base that is focused on the use of the arts (more specifically, poetry) as rehabilitation of incarcerated individuals. Lorraine Moller, in The International Journal of the Arts in Society, indicated through her study of a multi-year, poetry-based, arts peer support research supported program, that those who participated had a higher level of positive coping skills (resilience), that anger levels (which could lead to violence) declined through participation, and that they were more socially mature as a result.

Peer support research shows that we are viable as prevention of mental illness within at-risk youth. Evidence about peer support (which, as an evidence-based model, has been adopted by SAMHSA) has shown that it provides a 70% reduction in hospital visits and stays for issues such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or major depressive disorder. According to Data from Optum and the SAMHSA Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale program.